llliii>试卷(2015/04/27)

教甄教程◆英文題庫 下載題庫

104 年 - 南湖高中英文科試題#20938 

选择:45题,非选:2题
立即測驗 
我要補題 回報試卷錯誤 試卷下載
1.1. Wendy’s ________ when making a simple decision frustrates a lot of people.
(A) mantra
(B) protocol
(C) vacillation
(D) condescension
2.2. The ________ man captured the attention of all the women present at the party.
(A) debonair
(B) communal
(C) enamored
(D) incontrovertible
3.3. Jack ________ to his mother about the food at the fancy restaurant. He didn’t like it.
(A) demurred
(B) groused
(C) disrupted
(D) underwrote
4.4. Linda ________ for Peter when his parents asked him if he was home studying last night.
(A) bestowed
(B) deciphered
(C) hibernated
(D) vouched
5.5. Before he went to work, David wore a thick jacket to protect him from the ________ weather.
(A) blustery
(B) grueling
(C) radical
(D) scrumptious
6.6. Judy hopes to ________ her time at home by working as little as possible.
(A) meditate
(B) shelve
(C) peruse
(D) optimize
7.7. It is reported that quite a few exotic animals are in ________ and may go extinct soon.
(A) influx
(B) peril
(C) backdrop
(D) disposition
8.8. A statute of the ________ president sits right in the center of the college’s courtyard.
(A) nimble
(B) culinary
(C) valedictory
(D) venerable
9.9. More and more companies are planning to ________ a standard of excellence among their employees.
(A) lounge
(B) pilfer
(C) inculcate
(D) derail
10.10. Joseph always leaves the football stadium early to avoid the ________ that occurs when the games are over.
(A) melee
(B) arsenal
(C) aversion
(D) fortification
11.11. Last night, Mary ________ several shops to find the perfect gift for her mother’s birthday.
(A) foraged
(B) scoured
(C) imploded
(D) proliferated
12.12. Indeed, it is true that emotions are not ________, but they are still felt deeply.
(A) wishful
(B) diminutive
(C) confounding
(D) tangible
13.13. Jason is a great editor and always works ________ on his magazine.
(A) assiduously
(B) lavishly
(C) precipitously
(D) definitively
14.14. Doctors put dietary and physical ________ on some patients after their major surgery.
(A) breakthroughs
(B) contraptions
(C) constraints
(D) cavalcades
15.15. Sarah was great on her weight-loss programs, but she seems to have hit a _________.
(A) queue
(B) plateau
(C) digit
(D) cadence 
16.II. Syntax: Choose one wrong sentence. 15% (各 1.5 分)
【題組】 16.
(A) What do you say to going for a walk after work?
(B) I am not used to taking buses, for I usually drive everywhere.
(C) In the basement have boxes of toys the children no longer play with.
(D) A bad-tempered person has problems controlling his temper and gets angry easily.
17.【題組】17.
(A) Books are to mankind, so memory is to an individual.
(B) If I won the lottery, I would donate most of the money to charities.
(C) John barely has enough money to pay the rent, let alone pay for a new car.
(D) Peggy would rather remain single than marry someone she doesn’t love.
18.【題組】18.
(A) The cellphone has been all the rage since it hit the market in 2005.
(B) Facebook makes it possible for us to get to know people from all over the world.
(C) The doctor suggests that everyone has five servings of fruits and vegetables every day.
(D) I never pass by the elementary school without thinking of the days I spent there.
19.【題組】19.
(A) Your hair is too long; it is right time you had a haircut.
(B) This year, they harvested three times much as what they did last year.
(C) Lisa was furious when she saw his boyfriend holding another girl’s hand.
(D) Despite buying a new computer, Terry still doesn’t have Internet access.
20.【題組】20.
(A) The dog walked over to me with his tail wagging.
(B) There is no denying that Leonardo da Vinci is indeed a versatile genius.
(C) This morning, a flock of birds sat on a fence as if having waited for a long time.
(D) Had Peter fastened his seat belt yesterday, he might not have so serious injuries.
21.【題組】21.
(A) Should my sister call me, tell her I’m in the middle of the meeting.
(B) To get rid of your headache, all you have to do is taking the magic pill.
(C) Efficiently as the men build, the house will still take months to complete
(D) But for my mentor’s support, I might have given up my decision on studying abroad.
22.【題組】22.
(A) The more often you use your brains, the sharper you will be.
(B) For me, nothing is more precious than parents’ love in the world.
(C) It wasn’t until he lost the game did he realize the importance of practice.
(D) My mother thinks it is essential that everyone in our family help with the household chores.
23.【題組】23.
(A) To forgive is one thing; to forget is another.
(B) Tom tiptoed up the stairs lest he might waken his parents.
(C) By the time my parents come home tomorrow, I will have finished my work.
(D) Convinced that she could never learn to play the piano, she stopped taking lessons.
24.【題組】24.
(A) Such my amazement was that I became speechless then.
(B) Money isn’t worth having if you don’t know how to make good use of it.
(C) Only when we gather strength to face obstacles can we succeed in real life.
(D) She should have sensed my uneasiness, for she quickly glanced away and pretended nothing had happened.
25.【題組】25.
(A) What do you think is the most important thing in your life?
(B) The rain spoiled our holiday. How I wish it were a fine day yesterday.
(C) When she heard the heart-breaking news, she couldn’t help bursting out crying.
(D) It being a rainy day, people took cars or buses to work instead of walking.
26.III. Words in Context: Choose the best answer. (各 1 分) In a talk given in 1959, Richard Feynman was the first scientist to suggest the possibility of maneuvering things atom by atom. Based on this innovative idea in physics, scientists began to realize Dr. Feynman’s theory in the 1990’s, and the __26__ research is now fully developed around the world. This new technology of putting atoms where we want them to be is called nanotechnology, now widely applied in some manufacturing industries. Take packaging for example. Nanotechnology helps produce thinner material for beer bottles, which __27__ have a lighter weight and greater shelf-life. Reduced weight means transportation costs decline; greater shelf-life reduces __28__ and decreases overall costs to the end user. The clothing industry is also starting to feel the effects of nanotech. Many manufacturers are currently using embedded nanoparticles to create stain-repellent khakis. This innovation will __29__ not only khaki wearers. Detergent makers, dry cleaners, and stain-removal makers will experience a sharp decrease in customers. New materials produced through nanotech are not only used to improve existing products, but they are also extending their reach into areas formerly __30__ by metal, glass, and wood. This fairly low-tech application of nanotechnology is just the small tip of a vast iceberg, looming to sink even the “unsinkable” companies.
【題組】26.
(A)dominated
(B) spoilage
(C) permanently
(D) specialized
(E) related (AB) subsequently (AC) inflation (AD) impact (AE) slug
27.【題組】27
(A)dominated
(B) spoilage
(C) permanently
(D) specialized
(E) related (AB) subsequently (AC) inflation (AD) impact (AE) slug
28.【題組】28
(A)dominated
(B) spoilage
(C) permanently
(D) specialized
(E) related (AB) subsequently (AC) inflation (AD) impact (AE) slug
29.【題組】29
(A)dominated
(B) spoilage
(C) permanently
(D) specialized
(E) related (AB) subsequently (AC) inflation (AD) impact (AE) slug
30.【題組】30
(A)dominated
(B) spoilage
(C) permanently
(D) specialized
(E) related (AB) subsequently (AC) inflation (AD) impact (AE) slug
31.IV. Discourse Structure: Choose the best answer. 5% (各 1 分) Medical ethics is a system of moral principles that apply values and judgments to the practice of medicine. As a scholarly discipline, it encompasses the practical application in clinical settings as well as work on its history, philosophy, theology, and sociology. ___31___ The first code of medical ethics was published in the 5 th century. Thomas Percival crafted the first modern code of medical ethics in 1794 and expanded it in 1803, in which the expression “medical ethics” was coined. In the 20th century, this discipline went through a dramatic shift and largely reconfigured itself into bioethics. A common framework used in the analysis of medical ethics is the “four principles” approach postulated by T. Beauchamp and J. Childress in their textbook Principles of biomedical ethics. ___32___The first principle is respect for autonomy, which means the patient has the right to refuse or choose their treatment. Beneficence, the second principle, emphasizes that a practitioner should act in the best interest of the patient. The third principle, non-maleficence, means that doing no harm to patients is more important than doing them good. ___33___ These principles do not give answers as to how to handle a particular situation, but provide a useful framework for understanding conflicts. When moral values are in conflict, the result may be an ethical dilemma or crisis. Sometimes, no good solution to a dilemma in medical ethics exists, and occasionally, the values of the medical community (i.e., the hospital and its staff) conflict with those of the individual patient, family, or larger non-medical community. Conflicts can also arise between health care providers, or among family members. ___34___ Many so-called “ethical conflicts” in medical ethics are actually traceable back to a lack of communication. Communication breakdowns between patients and their health care team, between family members, or between members of the medical community, can all lead to disagreements and strong feelings. ___35___
【題組】31
(A) These breakdowns should be mended, and many apparently insurmountable “ethics” problems can be solved with open lines of communication.
(B) Confidentially is commonly applied to conversation between doctors and patients, and is commonly known as patient-physician privilege.
(C) It recognizes four basic moral principles, judged and weighed against each other, with attention given to the scope of their application.
(D) The last one, justice, concerns fairness and equality, that is, the distribution of scarce health resources and the decision of who gets what treatment.
(E) Historically, Western medical ethics may be traced to guidelines on the duty of physicians in antiquity, such as the Hippocratic Oath and early Christian teachings. (AB) For example, the principles of autonomy and beneficence clash when a patient does not want a treatment because of religious or cultural views.
32.【題組】32
(A) These breakdowns should be mended, and many apparently insurmountable “ethics” problems can be solved with open lines of communication.
(B) Confidentially is commonly applied to conversation between doctors and patients, and is commonly known as patient-physician privilege.
(C) It recognizes four basic moral principles, judged and weighed against each other, with attention given to the scope of their application.
(D) The last one, justice, concerns fairness and equality, that is, the distribution of scarce health resources and the decision of who gets what treatment.
(E) Historically, Western medical ethics may be traced to guidelines on the duty of physicians in antiquity, such as the Hippocratic Oath and early Christian teachings. (AB) For example, the principles of autonomy and beneficence clash when a patient does not want a treatment because of religious or cultural views.
33.【題組】33
(A) These breakdowns should be mended, and many apparently insurmountable “ethics” problems can be solved with open lines of communication.
(B) Confidentially is commonly applied to conversation between doctors and patients, and is commonly known as patient-physician privilege.
(C) It recognizes four basic moral principles, judged and weighed against each other, with attention given to the scope of their application.
(D) The last one, justice, concerns fairness and equality, that is, the distribution of scarce health resources and the decision of who gets what treatment.
(E) Historically, Western medical ethics may be traced to guidelines on the duty of physicians in antiquity, such as the Hippocratic Oath and early Christian teachings. (AB) For example, the principles of autonomy and beneficence clash when a patient does not want a treatment because of religious or cultural views.
34.【題組】34
(A) These breakdowns should be mended, and many apparently insurmountable “ethics” problems can be solved with open lines of communication.
(B) Confidentially is commonly applied to conversation between doctors and patients, and is commonly known as patient-physician privilege.
(C) It recognizes four basic moral principles, judged and weighed against each other, with attention given to the scope of their application.
(D) The last one, justice, concerns fairness and equality, that is, the distribution of scarce health resources and the decision of who gets what treatment.
(E) Historically, Western medical ethics may be traced to guidelines on the duty of physicians in antiquity, such as the Hippocratic Oath and early Christian teachings. (AB) For example, the principles of autonomy and beneficence clash when a patient does not want a treatment because of religious or cultural views.
35.【題組】35
(A) These breakdowns should be mended, and many apparently insurmountable “ethics” problems can be solved with open lines of communication.
(B) Confidentially is commonly applied to conversation between doctors and patients, and is commonly known as patient-physician privilege.
(C) It recognizes four basic moral principles, judged and weighed against each other, with attention given to the scope of their application.
(D) The last one, justice, concerns fairness and equality, that is, the distribution of scarce health resources and the decision of who gets what treatment.
(E) Historically, Western medical ethics may be traced to guidelines on the duty of physicians in antiquity, such as the Hippocratic Oath and early Christian teachings. (AB) For example, the principles of autonomy and beneficence clash when a patient does not want a treatment because of religious or cultural views.
36.V. Reading Comprehension: Choose the best answer. 15% (各 1.5 分) It is simple enough to say that since books have classes—fiction, biography, poetry—we should separate them and take from each what is right that each should give us. Yet few people ask from books what books can give us. Most commonly we come to books with blurred and divided minds, asking of fiction that it shall be true, of poetry that it shall be false, of biography that it shall be flattering, of history that it shall enforce our own prejudices. If we could banish all such preconceptions when we read, that would be an admirable beginning. Do not dictate to your author; try to become him. Be his fellow worker and accomplice. If you hang back, and reserve, and criticize at first, you are preventing yourself from getting the fullest possible value from what you read. But if you open your mind as widely as possible, then signs and hints of almost imperceptible fineness, from the twist and turn of the first sentences, will bring you into the presence of a human being unlike any other. Steep yourself in this, acquaint yourself with this, and soon you will find that your author is giving you, or attempting to give you, something far more definite. The thirty-two chapters of a novel—if we consider how to read a novel first—are an attempt to make something as formed and controlled as a building: but words are more impalpable than bricks; reading is a longer and more complicated process than seeing. Perhaps the quickest way to understand the elements of what a novelist is doing is not to read, but to write, to make your own experiment with the dangers and difficulties of words. Recall, then, some event that has left a distinct impression on you—how at the corner of the street, perhaps, you passed two people talking. A tree shook; an electric light danced; the tone of the talk was comic, but also tragic; a whole vision, an entire conception, seemed contained in that moment.
【題組】36. Which of the following statements is the writer’s attitude toward reading?
(A) Reading a long novel and building a house are not alike at all.
(B) Readers had better try to write themselves to realize what authors think about.
(C) Readers must not identify themselves with authors since they are totally different.
(D) Readers should be critical enough in the beginning of reading to get more valuable messages.
37.【題組】37. What does the word “dictate” probably mean?.
(A) to be fascinated by
(B) to tell someone how to behave
(C) to notice or discover something
(D) to say words for someone else to write down
38.【題組】38. What can be inferred from this passage?
(A) To be a good reader, one has only to read as much as he can.
(B) Readers should always hold certain expectations of the books they are going to read.
(C) Most readers tend to be limited to the horizons of their reading before taking a reading journey.
(D) After getting rid of preconceptions, readers will come to realize that the author gives them a vague idea.
39.If there’s any song that doesn’t need an introduction, it’s got to be this one. Imagine is famous the world over as an anthem for peace, embodying the spirit of harmony that both John Lennon and Yoko Ono promoted through their music and art. It is a basic message, asking for freedom from hunger, religion, and suffering. Imagine is still as relevant as ever, but it’s also clearly a product of its time. The song emerged fresh from the cultural upheaval of the 1960s, and was released in the midst of the Vietnam War, in 1971. Lennon, like many young people at the time, found the staggering loss of life in the war tragic and unnecessary. He vigorously advocated that there were always alternatives to conflict and violence and that it was unwise to blindly accept things the way they were. Aware of the influence Lennon could exert over his huge number of fans, the United States government felt extremely ill at ease about Lennon’s protests and agitations. It even attempted to deport Lennon from the country. The day John Lennon was assassinated, the world stood still. As journalist Peter Hamill remembered, “The telephones ringing, back and forth across the city…and then the dials being flipped from channel to channel. Yes. It was true. Somebody had murdered john Lennon…It made no sense, like a cruel trick. This was the guy who sang ‘Give peace a chance,’ shot down in cold blood…Not a politician. Not a man whose abstract ideas could send people to wars; not someone could marshal millions of human beings in the name of justice; not some actor on the stage of history. This time, the object of attack was a man who had made art, someone who had made us laugh, who had taught young people how to feel, who had helped change and shape an entire generation from inside out. This time someone had murdered a song.” Of all the songs that were murdered along with John Lennon, none is more relevant at this moment than his anthem that has changed the world, Imagine. Just take a look at the Imagine Tower in Iceland or the John Lennon Wall in Prague to see the lasting impact this song has had worldwide and across generations. It is gorgeous, profound, and transcendent, and will remain many people’s fondest memory of John Lennon.
【題組】39. What is the purpose of the passage?
(A) To introduce the life and music of John Lennon.
(B) To promote freedom of speech and artistic creation.
(C) To pay tribute to a classic song and the artist who created it.
(D) To explore the historical background of the Beatles generation.
40.【題組】40. According to the third paragraph, what distinguishes John Lennon’s death from that of a politician?
(A) A politician is an actor, while Lennon was an artist.
(B) A politician fights for justice, while Lennon gave peace a chance.
(C) A politician could be held accountable for war, while Lennon was innocent.
(D) A politician makes the world go round, while Lennon made the world stand still.
41.【題組】41. Why does the writer refer to Imagine as relevant in the second and final paragraphs?
(A) There is still war going on around the world.
(B) There are still musicians assassinated in the United States.
(C) The song is many people’s fondest memory of the Beatles.
(D) The song is a product of the cultural upheaval of the 1960s.
42. Traditional media may be declining in much of the rich world, but in poor countries it is booming. The growth in private media in developing countries has spurred much of the demand, as has new technology. That is stoking journalism training in far-flung places, in many shapes and sizes. They range from full degree programs to the short-term specialist training offered widely across Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Groups offering such courses include the BBC World Service Trust, the Reuters and Thomas Foundations, the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR) and Internews Network, a media-development charity based in America. These days the donors are particularly interested in niches, such as investigative reporting and 6 science writing. But that approach sometimes flops. The need for basic reporting skills is still central. Trainers stress the need for flexibility. Participants in the courses praise the results, while complaining about the lack of focus and coordination among some providers. Shapi Shacinda, the Reuters correspondent in Zambia and chairman of the press club in the capital. Lusaka, says that foreign-backed training in business and economic reporting has helped bring more skeptical coverage. Previously, news stories used to be taken straight from officials’ statements, he says. But governments are harder to teach. Encouraging students to probe sensitive topics may threaten their lives or livelihoods. An Iraqi journalist trained by and working with the IWPR was shot dead earlier this year. Just this week. Zambia’s minister of information asserted that state-run media should not criticize the government. In Russia, an organization founded by Internews has been closed by the authorities. who were apparently suspicious of its American backing. Rich-country governments can be a problem, too. Some try to influence the “messages” that trainers deliver, for example by insisting that their diplomats talk to classes on a regular basis. The big training groups insist that they control their own content. Blurring the boundaries can be dangerous both for journalists and the programs that support them, he notes. But others may be less choosy. More is not always better. Quality varies wildly. Places like Bangladesh and Rwanda have been showered with training in recent years. Gratitude is mixed with the wish for better coordination. David Okwemba of Kenya’s The Nation newspaper, who also helps train journalists, bemoans overlap between courses and providers’ failure to share information. Some courses aspire loftily to build democratic societies through a free press. The BCC Trust says it aims to give a say to the common man by holding institutions—public and private—to account. Such a range of goals makes measuring results difficult. Teaching how to point a camera or write a news story may be easy compared to raising awareness of broader issues such as HIV/AIDS. Many old news hands scoff at the notion of formal journalism education. A well-stocked and inquiring mind plus sharp penmanship are the main assets, they reckon. But even the most grizzled veterans of rich-world journalism still seem glad to earn extra money tutoring tyros in poor countries.
【題組】42. Which of the following is NOT mentioned as a reason why traditional media is booming in poor countries?
(A) The private media is developing at a fast pace.
(B) The new technology provides technical foundation.
(C) The demand for traditional media has been in steady increase.
(D) There are many journalism trainings in various shapes and sizes.
43.【題組】43. Which one of the following statements is true of the present training in those poor countries?
(A) The courses are mostly extensive rather than intensive.
(B) The training puts emphasis on the flexibility of basic reporting skills.
(C) Some trainees are satisfied with the training courses while some are complaining.
(D) The trainers are paying more attention to skills of investigative reporting and science writing.
44.【題組】44. Why does Shapi Shacinda think foreign-backed training in business and economic reporting has helped bring more skeptical coverage?
(A) There is a conservative tradition of news reporting in these countries.
(B) There exist some problems in the concept of news reports in these countries.
(C) The governments order that news stories should be taken from officials’ statements.
(D) The foreign-backed training is skeptical bout the previous news stories in these countries.
45.【題組】45. What may the attitude of veterans of journalism be towards the journalism training?
(A) Critical.
(B) Despicable.
(C) Inconsistent.
(D) Supportive.

【非選題】Part II I. Cloze-test making 20% Paraphrase the following article within 250 words and create a cloze test with five multiple-choice questions and then explain the purpose of the questions you have created. Photosynthesis is the basis of life on Earth. Thermodynamics is the order and disorder in the universe. Put them together and you have the makings of a book that may re-order the way you think about the world. And that is what Oliver Morton, news editor at Nature (and who once worked for this paper), has done. Mr. Morton’s thesis is that modern biology has become so focused on the movement of information, in the form of genes, that it has neglected the processes needed to move that information around: in essence, thermodynamics. People talk glibly of “using up” energy when in fact they are doing no such thing. What is actually used up is order. An energy flow drives the process, but it is disorder (or “entropy”, to use the jargon) that changes, by increasing. A highly ordered system like a living thing thus needs an abundant supply of negative entropy (or unentropy, or call it what you will) to maintain its internal order. That negative entropy comes from the sun and is captured by photosynthesis, which uses light to split water molecules and combines the resulting hydrogen with carbon dioxide to form sugars. The sugars are a store of negative entropy that can be used elsewhere. The waste product, conveniently for the animals of Earth, is oxygen. The book, then, is in part a refrain in praise of photosynthesis, the Earth’s energy and order currency-exchange market. It is also an entertaining history of how the subject arrived where it is today—and an illuminating insight for the non-scientist into how the magisterial pronouncements of science are every bit as much the result of sausage-making as Bismarck’s description of the process of legislation. The text is peppered with vignettes and asides that highlight science’s faltering march forward on the backs of researchers, who are by turns quirky and visionary. The process of discovery is not chronological but is forever folding back on itself, revisiting half-solved problems. Mr. Morton is careful to point out where progress has been impeded by hubris or tucked away in academic literature. There is also, of course, the inevitable warning. Having perfected the energy-into-order recipe over billions of years, photosynthesis has left a great deal of waste in the Earth, as well as contributing oxygen to the atmosphere. That buried waste—coal, oil, and natural gas—is what powers the industrial revolution still sweeping the Earth. By reuniting the two waste products of photosynthesis—oxygen in the air and carbon in the ground—this revolution has fuelled a rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide three times higher than any previous rise that can be measured. The system—the interaction between life and its surroundings: the atmosphere, the oceans, and the upper levels of the Earth’s crust—has been pushed out of equilibrium. Morton argues that the way in which industrialized humanity interfering with the homeostatic process can be undone—not by way of a single, magic bullet, but by pursuit of a number of ultimately achievable goals. The damage is done, but it is, he says, reparable. Humanity had better hope he is right.

#19443
編輯私有筆記

【非選題】II. Essay writing 25% Please write an essay within 350 words to make an exposition(論述) on the following poem. “To see a world in a grain of sand, And a heaven in a wild flower; Hold infinity in the palm of your hand, And eternity in an hour.”

#19444
編輯私有筆記