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103 年 - 國立臺中二中103學年度第一次教師甄選_英文科試題#21425 

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1.1. These volunteers tried to overcome public __________ towards the issue of stray animals by marching through streets to arouse people’s attention.
(A) sympathy
(B) pathos
(C) empathy
(D) apathy
2.2. In response to a slowing global economy, a ___________ demand for cheaper plane tickets presents huge opportunities for budget airlines.
(A) fluctuating
(B) burgeoning
(C) subsiding
(D) plummeting
3.3. The excuse John ___________ about having been abducted by aliens last night was not deemed by his teacher an acceptable explanation for not handing in his assignment.
(A) concocted
(B) insinuated
(C) stupefied
(D) derived
4.4. Ageism is also structurally determined by policy documents which ___________ the growing number of old people as a non-productive burden for the society.
(A) proliferate
(B) impede
(C) exorcise
(D) denigrate
5.5. After three hours of diplomatic negotiations, the representatives’ energy ___________ and thus they called for a short break to refresh themselves.
(A) coagulated
(B) mesmerized
(C) flagged
(D) railed
6.6. The prime minister tried to __________ people protesting the tax increase with a promise that he would endeavor to promote the welfare of all citizens.
(A) reproach
(B) mollify
(C) supersede
(D) champion
7.7. Molly was desperate to find her missing child, and her __________ face looked gaunt due to great anxiety and restlessness.
(A) pallid
(B) whimsical
(C) sterile
(D) rubicund
8.8. Over the years, Rossi has established himself as a medieval __________, delighting his audience with marvelous tales of thirteenth-century Britain.
(A) neophyte
(B) conscript
(C) raconteur
(D) talisman
9.9. The caring nurse is extremely ___________ of the health of every patient in the ward, treating them as her family.
(A) veracious
(B) perfidious
(C) reticent
(D) solicitous
10.10. The _________ smell of burning rubber exuded from that factory was so unbearable that residents living in the neighborhood complained to the press.
(A) stale
(B) aromatic
(C) pungent
(D) metallic
11.11. Rabbits are said to be _______ animals so much so that they groom themselves constantly.
(A) fastidious
(B) laconic
(C) impetuous
(D) malleable
12.12. Driven to distraction, he didn’t realize the sharp thorn had _______ his thumb until the blood oozed.
(A) rebuffed
(B) lacerated
(C) assuaged
(D) nettled
13.13. The plaza was sparkling with ________ conversation and intelligent debate about the current affair. No one considered these people brainless.
(A) senescent
(B) erudite
(C) opulent
(D) ubiquitous
14.14. The present farm was built in 1847 to replace the previous chateau which had become _______ and deserted after a conflagration.
(A) dilapidated
(B) obligatory
(C) solicitous
(D) saturated
15.15. The award winning choreographer is a dance _______. His choreography is creative, unconventional and sometimes controversial.
(A) charlatan
(B) maverick
(C) mercenary
(D) philistine
16.II. Cloze: 15%
 ( A ) The idea of treating other humans like chattel seems as antiquated as it is barbaric. But it is big business. Forced labor produces profits of about $150 billion annually, according to a report published today by the International Labor Organization (ILO). Sexual exploitation __(16) a fifth of all victims but two-thirds of profits. The most (17) region for this form of slavery, generating more than $30 billion in 2012 alone, is Asia. The average annual profits per victim of sexual exploitation are $22,000—more than four times (18) gained from non-domestic labor and almost (19) from domestic work. The ILO defines forced labor as involuntary work (20) force, fraud or deception when a penalty or the threat of a penalty is used to coerce. It puts the number of people in these conditions at 21m. Others, such as the Global Slavery Index, place the number as high as 30m—a partially visible workforce that is about the population of Canada.

【題組】16.
(A) accounts for
(B) comprises of
(C) distributes to
(D) ascribes to
17.【題組】17.
(A) irascible
(B) intrepid
(C) felicitous
(D) lucrative
18.【題組】18.
(A) this
(B) which
(C) those
(D) that
19.【題組】19.
(A) ten times the profit
(B) ten times of the profit
(C) ten time as profitable as
(D) ten times more profitable
20.【題組】20.
(A) rather than
(B) other than
(C) regardless of
(D) as a result of
21.( B ) Rocketing food prices-some of which have more than doubled in two years-have sparked riots in numerous countries recently. Millions are reeling from sticker shock and governments are (21) to stanch a fast-moving crisis before it spins out of control. From Mexico to Pakistan, protests have turned violent. Rioters tore through three cities in the West African nation of Burkina Faso last month, burning government buildings and looting stores. The forecast is (22) . Governments might quell the protests, but bringing down food prices could take at least a decade, food analysts say. One reason: billions of people are buying ever-greater quantities of food. Increasing meat consumption, for example, has helped drive up demand for grain, and (23) it the price. For the world’s poorest people, the price spikes are disastrous. Aid officials say that millions who previously (24) enough to feed their families can no longer afford the food, and are seeking help from relief organizations. That could change if food riots begin to threaten the survival of governments. In many poor countries, the protests have been fueled by pent-up anger against authoritarian or corrupt officials, some of whom have earned fortunes from oil and minerals while locals are struggling to buy food. Voters in Pakistan (25) President Pervez Musharraf’s party in crucial parliamentary elections last month, in part because many could no longer afford staple foods- and blamed the government.
【題組】21.
(A) scrambling
(B) retracting
(C) temporizing
(D) profligating
22.【題組】22.
(A) manipulative
(B) frivolous
(C) discordant
(D) grim
23.【題組】23.
(A) above
(B) by
(C) from
(D) with
24.【題組】24.
(A) dispensed from
(B) eked out
(C) infringed upon
(D) wheedle into
25.【題組】25.
(A) refracted
(B) intercepted
(C) trounced
(D) abstained
26.( C ) The worst of the hazards travelers encounter in the mountainous rainforests of southern India is not the elephants though they occasionally kill people; nor the creepy-crawlies, though the sudden appearance of a foot-long ___(26)___ millipede can startle. It is the leeches. If you pause on a walk through the forest, within a minute up to 20 of these brown slimy tubes, ranging in size from minuscule threads to fat worms four centimeters long and a quarter in diameter, leap onto your boots. Attracted by heat, they loop swiftly upwards like caterpillars on speed, scaling a Wellington in as little as 15 seconds. Leech socks stop those that climb into boots from attacking your feet. But others continue upwards, and however assiduously you plucke them off, some ___(27)___ make it onto bare skin and sink their teeth into your flesh. As they do so, their salivary glands secrete hirudin, an anticoagulant so effective that the pharmaceutical industry synthesizes it as a blood-thinning agent. ___(28)___ you locate them and pluck them off, your blood flows from their bites for hours. Not surprisingly, Kerala’s rainforests are thinly populated. Only the very determined, with a clear purpose and considerable ___(29)___, venture into them. Among those are Sathyabhama Biju Das, an amphibian researcher at Delhi University, his students and his growing band of followers. Mr. Biju is a Keralan who spent most of his childhood herding cows. He scraped an education, became a plant scientist, but was increasingly ___(30)___ amphibians. In 2003, he discovered a special species of purple frogs, which according to him gave him everything in his life. Thereafter, he devoted his life to the taxonomy of Indian frogs.
【題組】26.
(A) red-leg
(B) red-legs
(C) red-legged
(D) red-legging
27.【題組】27.
(A) equally
(B) unanimously
(C) deliberately
(D) inevitably
28.【題組】28.
(A) Even if
(B) Unless
(C) Given that
(D) Since
29.【題組】29.
(A) integrity
(B) resilience
(C) attachment
(D) reserve
30.【題組】30.
(A) detached from
(B) taken in
(C) drawn to
(D) subject to
31.III. Contextual Filling: 10% The new realism, in contrast to the old, begins by proposing a solution to the problem of distinguishing factors internal to international political systems from those that are external. Theory isolates one realm from others in order to deal with it intellectually. By depicting an international political system as a whole, with structural and unit levels at once distinct and connected, neorealism establishes the ___(31)____ of international politics and thus makes a theory possible. Neorealism develops the concept of a system’s structure which at once ___(32)____ the domain that students of international politics deal with and enables them to see how the structure of the system affect the interacting units and the outcomes they produce. The concept of structure is based on the fact that units differently juxtaposed and combined behave differently and ___(33)___ produce different outcomes. International structures are defined, first, by the ordering principle of the system, in our case anarchy, and second, by the distribution of capabilities across units. In an anarchic realm, structures are defined in terms of their major units. International structures vary with significant changes in the number of great powers. Great powers are marked off from others by the combined capabilities they __(34)____. When their number changes ___(35)____, the calculations and behaviors of states, and the outcomes their interactions produce, vary. The idea that international politics can be thought of as a system with a precisely defined structure is neorealism’s fundamental departure from traditional realism. The sparseness of the definition of international structure has attracted criticism. Robert Keohane asserts that neorealist theory “can be modified progressively to attain closer ___(36)____ with reality.” In the most sensitive and insightful essay on neorealism that I have read, Barry Buzan asks whether the logic of neorealism completely captures “the main features of the international political system.” He answers this way: “The criticisms of Ruggie, Keohane, and others suggest that it does not, because their concerns with factors such as dynamic density, information richness, communication facilities, and ___(37)____ do not obviously fit into Waltz’s ___(38)____ ‘systemic’ theory.” The “factors” mentioned by Buzan would not fit into any theory. Can one imagine how demographic trends, information richness and international institutions could be thrown into a theory? No theory can contain these “factors,” but if a theory is any good, it helps us to understand and explain them, to estimate their significance and to gauge their effects. Moreover, any theory leaves some things unexplained. To achieve “closeness of fit” would ___(39)____ theory. A theory cannot fit the facts or correspond with the events it seeks to explain. The ultimate closeness of fit would be achieved by writing a finely detailed description of the world that interests us. Nevertheless, neorealism continues to be criticized for its omissions. A theory can be written only by leaving out most matters that are of practical interest. To believe that listing the omissions of a theory ____(40)___ a valid criticism is to misconstrue the theoretical enterprise.
【題組】31. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
32.【題組】32. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
33.【題組】33. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
34.【題組】34. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
35.【題組】35. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
36.【題組】36. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
37.【題組】37. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
38.【題組】38. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
39.【題組】39. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
40.【題組】40. (AB). as such (AC). bounds (AD). command (AE). consequentially (BC). constitutes (BD). disprove (BE). equates (CD). falsify (CE). fastidiously (DE). in interacting (ABC). in retrospect (ABD). autonomy (ABE). negate (BCD). ostensibly (BCE). refute (BDE). correspondence (CDE). such like (ABCD). resemblance (ABCE). integration (ABDE). evokes
41.IV. Reading Comprehension: 20% (請注意:在第1篇文章中被標示的( A ) , ( B ) , ( C ) , ( D ) 為第 41題題目設計的一部份。 )
 (第 1 篇) One of the most basic concepts in plate tectonics, the study of the movements of the earth’s crust, is the idea of continental drift. As even small children often realize when studying an atlas or a globe, the continents as we know them now seem to be pieces of an enormous jigsaw puzzle. ( A ) This is because the continents were once, in fact, parts of a single supercontinent called Gondwanaland. For eons, however, they have been moving apart, and the oceans separating them have been growing wider. In order for the seas to expand, there must be some mechanism by which the ocean floor can itself spread out to fill the space vacated by the continents, a process which was finally discovered by scientists in the 1920’s. ( B ) Using sonar, a device that reads the reflected echoes of sound waves, and a specially developed magnetometer to measure magnetic fields, scientists discovered that the rocks closest to the mid-ocean ridges were younger than rocks found at a distance. ( C ) Further, closer inspection revealed that, while the sea floor close to these ridges was relatively free from debris, marine sediment became thicker as the distance from the ridges increased. Still more advanced testing uncovered the fact that there were unusually warm currents emanating from the area of the ridges. All of these pieces of evidence pointed to one inevitable conclusion: new rock was somehow being born there as the seafloor spread out from these ridges. So just how is this rock created? Magma (molten lava from the earth’s mantle) flowing up through the relatively thin crust of the ocean floor meets the cooler ocean water and quickly coalesces, forming the rock of the mid-ocean ridges. ( D ) Because, however, this new rock has no place to go, it exerts pressure against the sides of the fissure through which it emerged, widening the crack and “spreading” the floor of the ocean. It is precisely this mechanism that forces the continental plates apart, and is responsible, at least in part, for continental drift.

【題組】41. The following sentence--As is often the case, advances in technology led the way to scientific knowledge—can be integrated into the passage. Please choose one from the ( A )( B )( C )( D ) marked in the passage, where the sentence can best fit in .
42.【題組】42. Which of the following would be the best title for the passage?
(A) Oceanic Volcanoes
(B) Expansion of the Ocean Floor
(C) The Importance of Sonar
(D) The Discovery of Gondwanaland
43.【題組】43. All of the following are used in the study of mid-ocean ridges EXCEPT_________.
(A) marine sediment
(B) sonar
(C) temperature sensing equipment
(D) magnetometers
44.【題組】44. It can be inferred from the passage that _____________________________.
(A) the continents will soon form another large supercontinent
(B) magma can often be found floating in warm currents
(C) as one travels away from mid-ocean ridges, the rocks become older
(D) the warmer the water in the ocean is, the slower the continents move
45.【題組】45. The word “mechanism” in the third paragraph is closest in meaning to _____________.
(A) volcanic material
(B) cause
(C) machinery
(D) gravity
46.(第 2 篇) If you think the great equalizer in rank-conscious Washington is a summons to appear for jury duty, you haven’t been out to eat lately. Thanks to a ravenous appetite for fashionable food served in appetizer-size restaurants — and an abundance of millennial patience — the leveling agent for secretaries and Secretary of State alike boils down to this: More of us are waiting in line for dinner because restaurants aren’t taking reservations. Eager to explore the Thai fireworks at Little Serow in Dupont Circle at prime time? Prepare to wait up to three hours on weekends for one of fewer than 30 seats. Meanwhile, ramen slurpers know it’s easier to access Toki Underground on H Street NE on weekdays, when the wait might be a mere hour, versus the weekend, when the drill can take three times as long. The latest game-changer, Compass Rose off booming 14th Street NW, is a cozy source for international street food that offers snacks from Brazil, India and Spain — a little bit of everything, it seems, except for confirmed bookings. Restaurateurs say they don’t take reservations because they want to avoid no-shows and latecomers, but also because they know they can pack in more diners. Indeed, the policy, which clearly favors host over guest, is creating tension and buzz; as different as the aforementioned eateries are, they all play to full houses. It also illustrates an economy that has rebounded. In lean times, a business wouldn’t dare make it difficult for you to use them. The reality that so many worthy young restaurants are forgoing reservations is testament to a culture that gets as excited to see a star chef as the FLOTUS, and to a city that’s living to eat rather than eating to live. Maybe that’s what sets Washington apart from other markets: a high degree of self-importance. No other major food city makes some of its most coveted seats so hard to secure. Challenging as they are to access, even white-hot Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York and Flour + Water in San Francisco offer some reservations. The allure of the near-unattainable has been good for other than the sexy restaurants in question; beneficiaries of the no-reservations policy include the hot spots’ neighbors, where aspiring diners go to drink or snack while they wait, fingers crossed, to get a text or call informing them their table is ready. Jamie Leeds, the owner of two Hank’s Oyster Bars near Little Serow and Rose’s Luxury, picks up an extra dozen or so customers a night at her seafood eateries. The daily average might be small, she says, but over the course of the year, the numbers add up and the exposure is impressive. “Customers come back on their own.” On the surface, not saving tables sounds egalitarian. Whoever shows up first has a shot at getting in, regardless of clout or contacts. Anyone who has ever tried and failed to score seats at such extreme reservations as Minibar by José Andrés in Washington or the French Laundry from Thomas Keller in Napa Valley can appreciate the idea of more or less dining by lottery. But hospitality takes a holiday at establishments that don’t book. In effect, these restaurants are saying, “It’s more important for us to fill every seat than to treat diners like guests.” Think about it. Who invites people to dinner and then makes them wait until the cook is good and ready to let you in? By not guaranteeing tables, restaurants dismiss whole groups of would-be patrons. The masses include senior citizens who might not be able to stand for long or don’t go out after dark, parents who may be reluctant to shell out $20 an hour for child care for a meal that may or may not happen, and suburbanites reluctant to drive in for the chance to be turned away. I smell ageism. Sure enough, a scan of the dining rooms that don’t book tables could be a casting call for a J. Crew catalogue. About that defense from restaurants, that the no-reservation policy helps them avoid no-shows? The hospitality industry would be wise to adopt the practice of doctors, dentists and fitness trainers, who charge customers who fail to show for an appointment. A fair penalty. Affluent and over-educated Washingtonians are not used to being told no. It’s one thing for Open Table to let you know, late at night in the comfort of your pajamas, you can’t eat someplace on the day and time selected, quite another to be told “no” in person at a host stand with dates, clients — anyone you want to impress — in tow. Such restaurant rejection is yet another reminder of disruption culture; the old rules and old access don’t apply in 2014. If it hasn’t happened yet, it will soon: Someone with more money than time is going to enlist the help of an assistant, concierge or Craigslist to stand in line as a human place-holder for the bragging rights of a seat in a restaurant the public is dying to try. Fair or not — I vote not — that kind of behavior goes against the spirit of dining out, at least for me. A sense of camaraderie forms when you huddle with people on a joint mission, even one as ephemeral as dinner, and for some participants, the exhilaration of landing a hot table (“Yes! We made it!”) is right up there with successful deep-sea dives and climbs of Everest. Again, the restaurant wins, too. Which diner, having endured the hoops of nabbing a reservation at Noma, perhaps the toughest ticket on the planet right now, is going to say the food was just okay? What goes around comes around. When Erik Bruner-Yang, the chef of the no-reservations Toki Underground, visited a like-minded peer, his verbal review of the production began: “I waited two hours for Rose’s.”
【題組】46. The passage can best be described as _____.
(A) a survey of the inadequacies of a long-established practice
(B) a critique against class elitism disguised as egalitarianism
(C) a defense of an emerging innovation in restaurant management from anticipated objections
(D) a reflection on an impregnable trend in the catering trade
47.【題組】47. Which of the following words best expresses the sense of the word “clout” as it is used in the passage? _____.
(A) status
(B) authority
(C) wealth
(D) privilege
48.48. It can be inferred from the passage that _____
(A) Hank’s Oyster Bar adopts the no-reservations policy.
(B) In terms of hospitality, Open Table still qualifies as one of the “many worthy young restaurants.”
(C) Compass Rose is often full of young people.
(D) The American economy is in a recession.
49.(第 2 篇) If you think the great equalizer in rank-conscious Washington is a summons to appear for jury duty, you haven’t been out to eat lately. Thanks to a ravenous appetite for fashionable food served in appetizer-size restaurants — and an abundance of millennial patience — the leveling agent for secretaries and Secretary of State alike boils down to this: More of us are waiting in line for dinner because restaurants aren’t taking reservations. Eager to explore the Thai fireworks at Little Serow in Dupont Circle at prime time? Prepare to wait up to three hours on weekends for one of fewer than 30 seats. Meanwhile, ramen slurpers know it’s easier to access Toki Underground on H Street NE on weekdays, when the wait might be a mere hour, versus the weekend, when the drill can take three times as long. The latest game-changer, Compass Rose off booming 14th Street NW, is a cozy source for international street food that offers snacks from Brazil, India and Spain — a little bit of everything, it seems, except for confirmed bookings. Restaurateurs say they don’t take reservations because they want to avoid no-shows and latecomers, but also because they know they can pack in more diners. Indeed, the policy, which clearly favors host over guest, is creating tension and buzz; as different as the aforementioned eateries are, they all play to full houses. It also illustrates an economy that has rebounded. In lean times, a business wouldn’t dare make it difficult for you to use them. The reality that so many worthy young restaurants are forgoing reservations is testament to a culture that gets as excited to see a star chef as the FLOTUS, and to a city that’s living to eat rather than eating to live. Maybe that’s what sets Washington apart from other markets: a high degree of self-importance. No other major food city makes some of its most coveted seats so hard to secure. Challenging as they are to access, even white-hot Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York and Flour + Water in San Francisco offer some reservations. The allure of the near-unattainable has been good for other than the sexy restaurants in question; beneficiaries of the no-reservations policy include the hot spots’ neighbors, where aspiring diners go to drink or snack while they wait, fingers crossed, to get a text or call informing them their table is ready. Jamie Leeds, the owner of two Hank’s Oyster Bars near Little Serow and Rose’s Luxury, picks up an extra dozen or so customers a night at her seafood eateries. The daily average might be small, she says, but over the course of the year, the numbers add up and the exposure is impressive. “Customers come back on their own.” On the surface, not saving tables sounds egalitarian. Whoever shows up first has a shot at getting in, regardless of clout or contacts. Anyone who has ever tried and failed to score seats at such extreme reservations as Minibar by José Andrés in Washington or the French Laundry from Thomas Keller in Napa Valley can appreciate the idea of more or less dining by lottery. But hospitality takes a holiday at establishments that don’t book. In effect, these restaurants are saying, “It’s more important for us to fill every seat than to treat diners like guests.” Think about it. Who invites people to dinner and then makes them wait until the cook is good and ready to let you in? By not guaranteeing tables, restaurants dismiss whole groups of would-be patrons. The masses include senior citizens who might not be able to stand for long or don’t go out after dark, parents who may be reluctant to shell out $20 an hour for child care for a meal that may or may not happen, and suburbanites reluctant to drive in for the chance to be turned away. I smell ageism. Sure enough, a scan of the dining rooms that don’t book tables could be a casting call for a J. Crew catalogue. About that defense from restaurants, that the no-reservation policy helps them avoid no-shows? The hospitality industry would be wise to adopt the practice of doctors, dentists and fitness trainers, who charge customers who fail to show for an appointment. A fair penalty. Affluent and over-educated Washingtonians are not used to being told no. It’s one thing for Open Table to let you know, late at night in the comfort of your pajamas, you can’t eat someplace on the day and time selected, quite another to be told “no” in person at a host stand with dates, clients — anyone you want to impress — in tow. Such restaurant rejection is yet another reminder of disruption culture; the old rules and old access don’t apply in 2014. If it hasn’t happened yet, it will soon: Someone with more money than time is going to enlist the help of an assistant, concierge or Craigslist to stand in line as a human place-holder for the bragging rights of a seat in a restaurant the public is dying to try. Fair or not — I vote not — that kind of behavior goes against the spirit of dining out, at least for me. A sense of camaraderie forms when you huddle with people on a joint mission, even one as ephemeral as dinner, and for some participants, the exhilaration of landing a hot table (“Yes! We made it!”) is right up there with successful deep-sea dives and climbs of Everest. Again, the restaurant wins, too. Which diner, having endured the hoops of nabbing a reservation at Noma, perhaps the toughest ticket on the planet right now, is going to say the food was just okay? What goes around comes around. When Erik Bruner-Yang, the chef of the no-reservations Toki Underground, visited a like-minded peer, his verbal review of the production began: “I waited two hours for Rose’s.”
【題組】49. The author’s attitude toward the restaurants in question can best be described as _____.
(A) disparaging
(B) facetious
(C) panegyrical
(D) wry
50.【題組】50. According to the passage, which of the following features can be applied to all or some of the restaurants that don’t take reservations? ① bargain prices ② concierges in tow ③ customers’ recommendation ④ exotic cuisines⑤hospitality ⑥ rank-consciousness ⑦ star chef
(A) ③④⑤⑦
(B) ①③⑥⑦
(C)②④⑥⑦
(D)③④⑦