sesame>试卷(2015/07/06)

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100 年 - 海岸巡防人員、關務人員、稅務人員、退除役軍人轉任公務人員及國軍上校以上軍官轉任公務人員#23085 

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1.1 Are you sure that you want to be a ____________even though you don’t like public speaking?
(A)painter
(B)politician
(C)hairdresser
(D)musician
2.2 Childhood depression is ___________. Problems such as addiction and stress-related illnesses are now striking children at younger and younger ages.
(A)on the wane
(B)on the rise
(C)from now on
(D)for the record
3.3 When the Ottoman Empire attacked Constantinople in 1451, Constantinople was___________ by only 7,000 troops.
(A)fortified
(B)succeeded
(C)corrupted
(D)rebelled
4.4 When Neil___________ an invitation, he knows how to do it in a very graceful way so no one’s feeling is hurt.
(A)draws out
(B)takes off
(C)brings up
(D)turns down
5.5 We toured a 500-year-old castle, __________consisted of logs cemented with clay.
(A)its exterior
(B)the exterior of it
(C)with the exterior
(D)the exterior of which
6.You are visiting a European capital and you would like to take in some of the sights. But you are not so 6 on shelling out for an expensive tourist bus to be assailed by a loud commentary. So why not try public transport? It is cheap, it is fun to sit among the locals, and certain bus and tram routes are so 7 that they could have been set specifically with sightseers in mind. For example, in Berlin, you can journey through recent German history on the No. 100 double-decker bus as it crosses from the former West Berlin to what was once East Berlin. 8 it at the zoo. Then look for the bomb-damaged Kaiser Wilhelm Church tower, which stands as a 9 of the horrors of war. After passing the House of World Cultures, known by locals as the Pregnant Oyster, the bus approaches the Reichstag with a huge glass dome that sits over the plenary hall. Passing the Brandenburg Gate, you travel on Unter den Linden boulevard with its elegant 18th century buildings, which contrast sharply with the 10 East bloc architecture of Alexanderplatz, the final stop. Journey time: about 30 minutes.
【題組】6
(A)acute
(B)accurate
(C)keen
(D)sharp
7.【題組】7
(A)decorative
(B)dramatic
(C)ornamental
(D)scenic
8.【題組】8
(A)Catch
(B)Halt
(C)Hold
(D)Post
9.【題組】9
(A)keepsake
(B)reminder
(C)souvenir
(D)trophy
10.【題組】10
(A)shapely
(B)smart
(C)stark
(D)stylistic
11.11 No one starts a war—or rather, no one in his sense ought to do so—without first being clear in his mind what he intends to achieve by that war and how he intends to conduct it.
(A)Starting a war requires wisdom and determination.
(B)People often ignite a war, not knowing its goal or the ways to carry it out.
(C)People who wage a war should be conscious of their goal and the strategies to carry it out.
(D)One should know the results a war will lead to and therefore make a wise decision whether to carry it out or not.
12.12 The dancers of Cloud Gate are internationally renowned; we cannot praise them too highly.
(A)The dancers of Cloud Gate are too lofty to be praised.
(B)We should not praise the dancers of Cloud Gate too highly.
(C)It is internationally renowned that Cloud Gate is too good to be praised.
(D)We cannot give enough praises to Cloud Gate, which is internationally recognized.
13.13 In that conflagration which wiped out our house and more than 500 others, I sat in a car watching the fire pick apart my bedroom, our living room, all my past, present, and my future.
(A)From a car, I watched the great tide wash away over 500 houses, ours included; every part of the house was torn down, leaving nothing to start with.
(B)The sight of our house and 500 others appeared in the distance, creating a grand view which can be reflected throughout my life.
(C)Everything in my life went with the fire that burnt down our house and over 500 others, as I watched the scene from a car.
(D)With no hope at all for reconstruction, I sat in my car watching the storm rip off my house and 500 others.
14.14 While the passengers of a commuter bus are hardly a group, the “regulars” know and may well salute each other as well as the regular driver.
(A)The regular commuters on a bus may form a specific group of their own although they barely salute each other.
(B)The regular crowd would drink a toast to each other when they gradually become familiar with the bus route.
(C)The passengers on a commuter bus may not be an organized group, but the frequenters may knowingly greet each other and the driver.
(D)The frequenters of a commuter bus may salute each other and even the driver because they are a well-organized group.
15.15 George was not averse to inoculation until he had an adverse reaction to the vaccine.
(A)George strongly disliked vaccination until something changed him.
(B)George has always been unwilling to have vaccination since childhood.
(C)George has never had any vaccination before.
(D)George is unwilling to have vaccination because he once had a bad experience with it.
16.16 Proposals to expand protections for guest workers include one provision to bar employers from retaliating when the workers protest and another that would let them sue in federal court over contract violations.
(A)To expel guest workers, it is proposed that new laws be made so the employers can cancel contracts with guest workers if they protest.
(B)Legal provisions are proposed to protect guest workers, which would allow workers to protest and to sue against their employers.
(C)The proposed new provisions will allow the employers to retaliate in case of protest or contract violations by workers.
(D)With the added provisions, guest workers can bring employers to justice if they are fired. A doctor friend of ours, when she’s given to philosophizing about the art of diagnosis, has a favorite saying: “If what you see are hoof prints, don’t go looking for zebras.” That’s her homespun version of the thing philosophers call Occam’s Razor: that the simplest explanation ought to prevail. A tidy sentiment. But real life doesn’t always hew to the wisdom of philosophers. As we in Dodgeville discovered when a footloose kangaroo turned up in our midst. Now, kangaroo sightings are to Wisconsin what sightings of Bigfoot are to the Pacific Northwest: more likely to be reported than confirmed. Back in the 1970s, there was a spate of sightings around the Milwaukee suburb of Wauwatosa. And another rash a few years earlier in Menomonee Falls. And so, on the morning of January 5, when a longtime resident called into our local sheriff’s office to report a kangaroo on the loose on her property, Sheriff Steve Michek had the predictable reaction: “There’s gotta be a simple explanation.” The day of the sighting, a snowfall expected to reach seven-to-nine inches had begun descending over Dodgeville. Sheriff Steve got his first glimpse of the creature through a swirl of dancing snowflakes. There he stood—big as life—with a fluffy cap of the white stuff improbably dusting his back and shoulders. Sheriff Steve says his own reaction could be summed up in two words: “Holy smoke!” Except, he says with embarrassment, he didn’t say the word “smoke.” Once backup arrived, Steve and the deputies sprang into action. Sheriff Steve: “We formed a perimeter.” With a little bit of coaxing (and a bribe of apples), the renegade was lured into a barn on the property and quietly settled down in a tidy box stall. Officials from the Henry Vilas Zoo in nearby Madison were contacted and the fugitive taken into custody. The zoo folks have since speculated that our unlikely visitor is most likely somebody’s rogue exotic pet. That would, after all, be the simple explanation. Which brings us round to the moral of our story: next time you discover some curious critter tracks outside your garden window—don’t rule out the zebras. Or the kangaroos.
17.17 Where is the passage most likely published?
(A)A local newsletter.
(B)A magazine for pet lovers.
(C)A newspaper for animal trading.
(D)A flyer of crackdown on animal theft.
18.18 According to the passage, which of the following statements is true?
(A)Dodgeville is located in Australia, where snow is common.
(B)Dodgeville is a town where kangaroo sightings are rare.
(C)Dodgeville has historical sites of Bigfoot in the 1970s.
(D)Dodgeville produces many philosophers and doctors.
19.19 According to the passage, which of the following statements is true?
(A)The Kangaroo coexisted with Bigfoot around the Milwaukee suburb.
(B)The Kangaroo ran to Dodgeville all the way from the Pacific Northwest.
(C)The Kangaroo was suspected to be a resident’s companion in Dodgeville.
(D)The Kangaroo was eager to have apples in a barn not far from the Henry Vilas Zoo.
20.20 According to the passage, which of the following statements is true?
(A)People in Dodgeville consider animals not local ones when unfamiliar tracks appear.
(B)People in Dodgeville don’t explain too much because the philosopher suggests silence.
(C)People in Dodgeville don’t forget to make their animal cages available in the garden.
(D)People in Dodgeville call the Sheriff once a suspicious animal crawls in town.
21.21 According to the passage, who does the “fugitive” refer to?
(A)the sheriff
(B)the kangaroo
(C)the zookeeper
(D)the criminal
22.22 題至第 25 題為篇章結構,各題請依文意,從四個選項中選出最合適者,各題答案內容不重複 The phony culture of contemporary American is characterized by immediacy. The constant emphasis is on the now, the new, the fashionable, the thing of the moment, what is happening right now, what is hot, and what is not, where it is at, the immediate experience. What is current and hyped is what is real. 22 In a phony culture, not only do people have no sense of place, they also have no sense of time. Time and the sense of temporality—memory and projection—lose importance. The narrow focus on “now” reinforces the ascendancy of the ephemeral: what is happening now is what is real and important. 23 Everything becomes unmemorable and quite forgettable just because it is old and passing out of the new immediate moment. The new is always something that can be hyped: the next experience, thing, or personage is given allure and thus desirability. One is hopelessly “out of date” if he or she does not yearn for the newest. All things old—cars, clothes, presidents, spouses—are potential throwaways. 24 Without either a sense of history or a coherent view of the future, people are easily lured to the phony object of the moment, drawing attention towards the plaything of the now but diverting attention from a larger view of the temporal world which invites self-placement. 25 News is hyped “new” information that is sold like any other hot commodity, and there truly is nothing as old as yesterday’s news.
【題組】 22
(A)The unreal and unimportant is associated with what is past or what is easily disposable.
(B)But confidence in the new is something that has to be created, through the good offices of hype artists who “phony up” futures of newfound pleasures and delights.
(C)Reality is momentary, the symbolic focus of the ephemeral now.
(D)People have little sense of temporal placement, of the continuity of national past and present, of the legacy of history and the promise of posterity.
23.【題組】23
(A)The unreal and unimportant is associated with what is past or what is easily disposable.
(B)If people seek the newest thing that is hyped, it is likely to be a frivolity, something of little weight or importance.
(C)People have little sense of temporal placement, of the continuity of national past and present, of the legacy of history and the promise of posterity.
(D)Reality is momentary, the symbolic focus of the ephemeral now.
24.【題組】24
(A)People have little sense of temporal placement, of the continuity of national past and present, of the legacy of history and the promise of posterity.
(B)If people seek the newest thing that is hyped, it is likely to be a frivolity, something of little weight or importance.
(C)But confidence in the new is something that has to be created, through the good offices of hype artists who “phony up” futures of newfound pleasures and delights.
(D)Reality is momentary, the symbolic focus of the ephemeral now.
25.【題組】25
(A)If people seek the newest thing that is hyped, it is likely to be a frivolity, something of little weight or importance.
(B)The news, for example, is hyped to draw our attention to the “hot story” of the moment, but does little to place events in a larger context of historical process.
(C)But confidence in the new is something that has to be created, through the good offices of hype artists who “phony up” futures of newfound pleasures and delights.
(D)People have little sense of temporal placement, of the continuity of national past and present, of the legacy of history and the promise of posterity.