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106 年 - 106年大學入學考試指定考試-英文科#62729 

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1.1. Martha has been trying to ______ her roommate since their quarrel last week, as she doesn’t want to continue the argument.
(A) overgrow
(B) bother
(C) pursue
(D) avoid .

2.2. As David finished the last drop of the delicious chicken soup, he licked his lips and gave out sounds of ______.
(A) contentment
(B) dominance
(C) explosion
(D) affection .

3.3. After several rounds of intense fighting, the boxer punched his ______ right in the face, knocked him out, and won the match.
(A) performer
(B) attendant
(C) opponent
(D) messenger .

4.4. Watch out! The bench has just been painted. You can fan the wet paint if you want to ______ its drying.
(A) fasten
(B) hasten
(C) lengthen
(D) strengthen .

5.5. Warm milk ______ sleepiness. So if you have trouble falling asleep, try drinking some warm milk before going to bed.
(A) conceals
(B) recruits
(C) absorbs
(D) induces .

6.6. Having worked five years as a data processor in a small town, Alice is tired of the routine of her job and the ______ of her life.
(A) disturbance
(B) salvation
(C) remainder
(D) monotony .

7.7. Peter has never been on time to meetings or appointments. It would be interesting to look into reasons why he is ______ late.
(A) chronically
(B) hysterically
(C) simultaneously
(D) resistantly .

8.8. The film Life of Pi won Ang Lee an Oscar in 2013 for Best Director—one of the most ______ awards in the movie industry.
(A) populated
(B) surpassed
(C) coveted
(D) rotated .

9.9. According to environmental scientists, the earth is likely to experience significant ______ changes within the next century.
(A) provincial
(B) ecological
(C) authentic
(D) redundant .

10.10. Traditional Chinese medical practices include ______ remedies, which use plants, plant parts, or a mixture of these to prevent or cure diseases.
(A) herbal
(B) frantic
(C) magnetic
(D) descriptive .

11.第 11 至 15 題為題組 France, home to such major fashion houses as Chanel, Dior, and Yves Saint Laurent, has joined Italy, Spain, and Israel in adopting laws against super-skinny models on catwalks or in ads.The French government has passed a bill that will 11 the use of excessively skinny models. Modeling agencies violating the law can receive a fine of up to US$81,000, with up to six months in jail for staff involved. According to French officials, the measure aims to 12 the glorification of dangerously thin models. Under the approved legislation, models will have to present a medical 13 that proves they are healthy before being allowed to work in the fashion industry. Moreover, they will be 14 regular weight checks. Modeling agencies will have to produce a medical report showing that their models have maintained a 15 body mass-to-height ratio. This bill is expected to change young women’s view on the ideal female form.
【題組】 11.
(A) forecast
(B) represent
(C) criminalize
(D) distinguish .

12.【題組】12.
(A) put up with
(B) crack down on
(C) give in to
(D) look out for .

13.【題組】13.
(A) coverage
(B) certificate
(C) operation
(D) prescription .

14.【題組】14.
(A) subject to
(B) accustomed to
(C) blessed with
(D) familiar with .

15.【題組】15.
(A) healthy
(B) pleasant
(C) frequent
(D) distinctive .

16.第16 至 20 題為題組 One factor that separates a living thing from an inanimate object is the organism’s ability to carry out chemical reactions that are crucial for its survival. Imagine the infinite amount of reactions that a large organism such as human carries out every single day. 16 of these reactions are possible without enzymes. Enzymes consist of various types of proteins that work to drive the chemical reactions 17 for certain types of nutrients to take effect. Enzymes can either launch a reaction or speed it up. In the absence of enzymes, reactants may take hundreds of years to convert into a usable product, if they are able to do so 18 . This is why enzymes are crucial in the sustenance of life on earth. Enzymes, 19 , do not always function perfectly. In 1902 Sir Archibald Garrod was the first to attribute a 20 to an enzyme defect, which he later referred to as an “inborn error of metabolism.” Today, newborns are routinely screened for certain enzyme defects such as PKU (phenylketonuria) and galactosemia, an error in the handling of the sugar galactose.
【題組】 16.
(A) Any
(B) All
(C) None
(D) More .

17.【題組】17.
(A) requires
(B) required
(C) requiring
(D) to require .

18.【題組】18.
(A) at all
(B) at hand
(C) at first
(D) at ease .

19.【題組】19.
(A) hereafter
(B) instead
(C) likewise
(D) however .

20.【題組】20.
(A) disease
(B) balance
(C) measure
(D) statement .

21.第 21 至 30 題為題組 Hundreds of years ago, a savory idea—called the century egg—was hatched in rural China. As the story goes, a farmer found naturally preserved duck eggs in a muddy pool of water and slaked lime. After surviving a tasting, he set out to replicate them manually, resulting in a 21 that would endure for centuries as a comfort food in Hong Kong, China and parts of Southeast Asia. Though details of the century egg’s discovery are undocumented, scientists estimate that it 22 more than 500 years to the Ming Dynasty. And aside from some techniques used for large-scale production today, the egg preservation process has remained relatively 23 .To make the eggs, a vat is typically filled with a combination of strong black tea, lime, salt and freshly burned wood ashes, and left to cool overnight. The next day, duck, quail, or chicken eggs are added to the 24 . Then they soak anywhere from seven weeks to five months—not for a century as the name 25 . The century egg also 26 many other names, such as hundred-year egg, thousand-year egg, or millennium egg. But no matter what it’s called, this common snack has a rather uncommon taste and is often grouped by travelers with other 27 Asian foods such as chicken feet or snake soup. Getting beyond the egg’s appearance is the first 28 . Instead of being white with a bright orange yolk, the jellylike egg takes on a less 29 dark brown and swampy green hue. There’s also a pungent ammonia-like odor to contend with, which has earned the snack yet another nickname: the “horse urine egg.” While the century egg draws a following from older generations and curious travelers, it is falling out of 30 with the younger set, who are weary of China’s preserved and fermented foods. The future of the humble snack is uncertain, but chefs in Chinese restaurants are still trying to preserve this nostalgic bite of culinary heritage. (AB) provokes (AC) exotic (AD) delicacy (AE) dates back (BC) refreshed (BD) implies (BE) appetizing (CD) mixture (CE) goes by (DE) unchanged (ABC) challenge (ABD) favor
【題組】 21.

22.【題組】 22.

23.【題組】23.

24.【題組】24.

25.【題組】25.

26.【題組】26.

27.【題組】27.

28.【題組】28.

29.【題組】29.

30.【題組】30.

31.第 31 至 35 題為題組 One of the most difficult things for a human to face is the loss of a limb. If a person loses an arm or a leg, he/she must be fitted with an artificial limb. The situation is very different for a starfish. If a starfish loses an arm, it can grow a new one. 31 Snails can even regrow their heads—imagine what the world would be like if humans could do that. But we can’t. Nor can we grow new limbs or even fingers. That’s why scientists are studying animals that can regrow body parts, that is, regenerate. 32 Many different kinds of animals show some form of regeneration. Most of them are, however, limited to the sort a lizard is capable of, like regrowing a lost tail. A cockroach can grow back a missing limb, but the limb itself can’t generate a new cockroach. 33 Bidirectional regeneration, on the other hand, refers to a situation in which splitting of an animal will result in separate fully functional animals. 34 Cut a hydra in half, and you’ll get two hydras. Cut it into four pieces, and you’ll get four. 35 A single one can be cut into hundreds of pieces and each will grow back into a whole in a week or so. Because of this remarkable ability, one planarian can be created over and over, giving it a sort of immortality. Whether this phenomenon can be achieved in humans will likely require years of research. 
(AB) Scientists call this unidirectional regeneration. (AC) Humans aren’t completely without regenerative talents. (AD) The same thing happens for lobsters, salamanders, and many other animals. (AE) When it comes to regeneration, few animals can equal the magic of the planarian. (BC) This type of regeneration is demonstrated in a few animals, such as hydras and sea stars. (BD) They hope that this line of research will make regeneration possible in humans someday.

【題組】 31 
(A) Scientists call this unidirectional regeneration.
(B) Humans aren’t completely without regenerative talents.
(C) The same thing happens for lobsters, salamanders, and many other animals.
(D) When it comes to regeneration, few animals can equal the magic of the planarian.
(E) This type of regeneration is demonstrated in a few animals, such as hydras and sea stars. (BD) They hope that this line of research will make regeneration possible in humans someday..

32.【題組】32 
(A) Scientists call this unidirectional regeneration.
(B) Humans aren’t completely without regenerative talents.
(C) The same thing happens for lobsters, salamanders, and many other animals.
(D) When it comes to regeneration, few animals can equal the magic of the planarian.
(E) This type of regeneration is demonstrated in a few animals, such as hydras and sea stars. (BD) They hope that this line of research will make regeneration possible in humans someday..

33.【題組】33 
(A) Scientists call this unidirectional regeneration.
(B) Humans aren’t completely without regenerative talents.
(C) The same thing happens for lobsters, salamanders, and many other animals.
(D) When it comes to regeneration, few animals can equal the magic of the planarian.
(E) This type of regeneration is demonstrated in a few animals, such as hydras and sea stars. (BD) They hope that this line of research will make regeneration possible in humans someday..

34.【題組】34 
(A) Scientists call this unidirectional regeneration.
(B) Humans aren’t completely without regenerative talents.
(C) The same thing happens for lobsters, salamanders, and many other animals.
(D) When it comes to regeneration, few animals can equal the magic of the planarian.
(E) This type of regeneration is demonstrated in a few animals, such as hydras and sea stars. (BD) They hope that this line of research will make regeneration possible in humans someday..

35.【題組】35 
(A) Scientists call this unidirectional regeneration.
(B) Humans aren’t completely without regenerative talents.
(C) The same thing happens for lobsters, salamanders, and many other animals.
(D) When it comes to regeneration, few animals can equal the magic of the planarian.
(E) This type of regeneration is demonstrated in a few animals, such as hydras and sea stars. (BD) They hope that this line of research will make regeneration possible in humans someday..

36.第 36 至 39 題為題組 Often named as the most prominent contemporary female architect, Zaha Hadid, an Iraqi-born British woman, is significant for her intellectual toughness and her refusal to compromise on her artistic ideas. For many years, her designs filled the pages of architecture journals but were dismissed as impractical or too radical. Also, being female in a male-dominated field didn’t help her succeed. Despite these setbacks, her star began to rise when her design for Cincinnati’s new Center for Contemporary Art was selected and built, earning her worldwide acclaim. The New York Times described the building as “the most important new building in America since the Cold War.” Once her talent was recognized, commissions started coming in to design a variety of projects, including public transportation, libraries, and opera houses. In 2004, Hadid became the first woman to win the prestigious Pritzker Prize. She also won the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011. Hadid’s interest in architecture had roots in a trip her family took to the ancient Sumer region in southern Iraq, the site of one of the world’s oldest civilizations, when she was a teenager. She recalled: “The beauty of the landscape—where sand, water, reeds, birds, buildings, and people all somehow flowed together—has never left me. I’m trying to discover—invent, I suppose—an architecture, and forms of urban planning, that do something of the same thing in a contemporary way.” Nature’s forms appear as a recurrent source of inspiration for Hadid’s architecture. Her designs are daring and visionary experiments with space and with the relationships of buildings to their urban surroundings. She consistently pushes the boundaries of architecture and urban design in the pursuit of a visionary aesthetic that expresses her ideals.
【題組】 36. According to the passage, what is a major factor in Hadid’s success?
(A) Her family support.
(B) Her ethnic origin.
(C) Her gender and education.
(D) Her vision and talent. .

37.【題組】37. What does the author mean by “…her star began to rise…” in the second paragraph?
(A) She started to make a fortune.
(B) She became more recognized.
(C) Her designs became classical.
(D) Her ideas started to take shape. .

38.【題組】38. What is the third paragraph mainly about?
(A) The cultural background of Hadid’s family.
(B) The beautiful landscape of Hadid’s hometown.
(C) A vivid recollection of Hadid’s life as a teenager.
(D) A fundamental source of Hadid’s architectural philosophy. .

39.【題組】39. According to the passage, which of the following is true about Hadid’s career in architecture?
(A) She built the first Center for Contemporary Art in New York.
(B) Her architecture projects mainly involve museums in urban areas.
(C) Her works can be characterized as boldly contemporary and innovative.
(D) Her early designs were often rejected because of her political background. .

40.第 40 至 43 題為題組 Todd Bol, a retired businessman, could never have expected that a wooden container he built on his deck one day in 2009 would have the global impact it does today. Bol built a dollhouse-size structure that looked like a schoolhouse on a post, and he put it on his lawn as a free community library to commemorate his mother, who was a book lover and school teacher. Bol’s prototype gave birth to Little Free Library (LFL), a nonprofit organization that seeks to place small, accessible book exchange boxes in neighborhoods around the world. The concept is simple: Neighbors are invited to share a book, leave a book, or both. Today, there are over 50,000 of these libraries registered in 70 countries.Almost everyone can register with LFL and start a library as long as the person keeps it in good shape and makes sure that book materials are appropriate for his/her neighborhood. Library owners can create their own library boxes; therefore, the libraries are usually unique in appearance, and there seems to be no limit to the possibilities. One library in California was built out of a used wine crate; another in Texas had tiny stairs and bright colored walls. Once registered, libraries are assigned a number at LFL’s website. The LFL Index lists the locations of all libraries with GPS coordinates and other information. Owners receive a sign that reads “Little Free Library.” People say they have been more inclined to pick up a book when walking by a Little Free Library, out of curiosity and because it’s convenient. Some sidewalk librarians say they have met more neighbors since having a little library in their front yard. Bol is also most proud of the way Little Free Library is bringing communities together. “It’s started a neighborhood exchange. It gets people talking and more comfortable with their neighbors,” he says. “This leads to them helping each other.”

【題組】 40. Which of the following statements is NOT mentioned about Todd Bol?
(A) His mother used to be a school teacher.
(B) He was engaged in trade and commerce.
(C) He provided a great service to his neighborhood.
(D) He built a schoolhouse to pay tribute to his mother. .

41.【題組】41. What does “prototype” refer to in the second paragraph?
(A) A community center.
(B) A book exchange box.
(C) A dollhouse on a post.
(D) A nonprofit organization. .

42.【題組】42. Which of the following is true about the operation of a Little Free Library?
(A) The library can come in any shape and color.
(B) There is no limit to the selection of its materials.
(C) The owner must first be assigned a number from the LFL website.
(D) The librarian is in charge of checking the books in and out of the library. .

43.【題組】43. What is a contribution of Little Free Library?
(A) The LFL Index can improve GPS functions.
(B) It promotes reading and literacy in a simple way.
(C) It helps to strengthen library associations around the world.
(D) Its location satisfies people’s curiosity about their neighbors. .

44.第 44 至 47 題為題組 The term “forensic linguistics,” in its broadest sense, covers all areas of study where language and law intersect. A famous example of its application is the case of Chris Coleman, who was suspected of killing his family in 2009. Robert Leonard, the head of the forensic linguistics program at Hofstra University, presented some important linguistic evidence in the trial against Coleman. Relying heavily on word choice and spelling, Leonard suggested that the same person had written the threatening e-mails and sprayed the graffiti, and that those samples bore similarities to Coleman’s writing style. Coleman was later found guilty of the murder. Robert Leonard was not the first one who resorted to linguistic evidence in criminal investigation. The field of forensic linguistics was brought to prominence by his colleague James Fitzgerald in 1996 with his work in the case of the Unabomber, who had sent a series of letter bombs to college professors over several years, causing serious casualties. Working for the FBI, Fitzgerald urged the publication of the Unabomber’s letter—a lengthy declaration of the criminal’s philosophyAfter the letter was published, many people called the FBI to say they recognized the writing style. By analyzing sentence structure, word choice, and other linguistic patterns, Fitzgerald narrowed down the range of possible authors and finally linked the letter to the writings of Ted Kaczynski, a solitary former mathematician. For instance, Kaczynski tended to use extensive parallel phrases, which were frequently found in the bomber’s letter. Both Kaczynski and the bomber also showed a preference for dozens of unusual words, such as “chimerical” and “anomic.” The bomber’s use of the terms “broad” for women and “negro” for African Americans also enabled Fitzgerald to roughly calculate the suspect’s age. The linguistic evidence was strong enough for the judge to search Kaczynski’s isolated cabin in Montana; what was found there put him in prison for life. On some level, finding hidden meanings from linguistic evidence is what we all do intuitively in our daily language interaction. This is exactly the same work forensic professionals do. As one forensiclinguistics firm, Testipro, puts it in its online promotional ad, the field can be regarded as “the basis of the entire legal system.”

【題組】 44. What is the main idea of the passage?
(A) Robert Leonard has provided linguistic evidence in court cases.
(B) The FBI relies mainly on language experts to solve its crime cases.
(C) Studying texts can provide critical evidence in criminal investigations.
(D) Finding hidden meanings in language use is important for daily interactions. .

45.【題組】45. Which of the following is true about the Unabomber?
(A) He didn’t like to be called negro.
(B) He was good at analyzing the use of language.
(C) He declared his philosophy in a written statement.
(D) He was a professor of mathematics living on Hofstra campus. .

46.【題組】46. What type of language feature is NOT mentioned in the passage?
(A) Sound pattern.
(B) Spelling of words.
(C) Selection of words.
(D) Grammatical pattern. .

47.【題組】47. What can be inferred from the passage?
(A) Meaning can be distorted in the process of writing.
(B) Some features in language use are shared by everyone.
(C) Crimes are usually committed by people who are highly educated.
(D) People tend to stick to certain habitual patterns in their use of language. .

48.第 48 至 51 題為題組 During the past three hundred years, when a country gains its freedom or independence, one of the first things established is a national anthem. National anthems are generally played and sung at formal state occasions and other events which celebrate or support the country’s national identity. Holland’s 16th-century hymn “Het Wilhelmus” is widely considered the world’s oldest national anthem, followed by the U.K.’s “God Save the King/Queen”—also a hymn, popularized in the 1740s. As nationalism spread throughout Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries, so did anthems. Many countries, such as the independent states that are today part of Germany, took “God Save the King/Queen” as a model and adopted hymns (songs of prayer typically addressed to a deity or VIP). Others, notably Spain and France, chose marches (songs with a strong, regular rhythm often performed by military bands)—which expressed a martial rather than monarchic spirit. With imperialism, Europeans spread their musical taste. Even when former colonies gained independence, they often imitated the traditions of their former rulers. The result is that most anthems are either hymns or marches, played on European instruments. Japan’s anthem makes for a good case study of European influence. In the 1860s a British bandmaster living in Japan, John William Fenton, noted that the country did not have a national anthem. A local military officer, Ōyama Iwao, selected the lyrics from a Heian era poem and Fenton wrote the melody. About a decade later, a Japanese committee chose a replacement melody by a court musician—one that had been composed for traditional Japanese instruments, but in a mixed style influenced by Fenton’s arrangement. The version in use today was also altered by German Franz Eckert to fit a Western scale. In addition to hymns and marches, British composer Michael Bristow identifies a couple of more minor categories. National anthems in South and Central America are often operatic, with long, elaborate orchestral introductions. These were influenced by 19th-century Italian opera. Burma and Sri Lanka are both in a folk group, as they rely more on indigenous instruments.
【題組】 48. Which of the following is NOT mentioned as a basis to compose national anthems?
(A) Prayer songs.
(B) Marching songs.
(C) Italian opera music.
(D) Movie theme music. .

49.【題組】49. What is the second paragraph mainly about?
(A) The function of national anthems.
(B) The world’s oldest national anthem.
(C) The origin and spread of national anthems.
(D) Reasons why many countries have national anthems. .

50.【題組】50. Which of the following is true regarding Japan’s national anthem?
(A) It was not written until the 20th century.
(B) The lyrics was written by a Japanese officer.
(C) The melody was first composed by a British musician.
(D) The current version is barely influenced by western music. .

51.【題組】51. What can be inferred about the influence of European imperialism on national anthems?
(A) Human rights are a common theme in national anthems.
(B) National anthems of some countries share similar musical features.
(C) Many national anthems were chosen by ruling European countries.
(D) Local traditions were excluded in the composition of national anthems. .

【非選題】
52.1. 世界大學運動會(The Universiade)是一項國際體育與文化盛事,每兩年一次由不同城市舉辦。

【非選題】
53.2. 在比賽中,來自全球大學的學生運動員建立友誼,並學習運動家精神的真諦。

【非選題】
54.二、英文作文 ( 占 2 0 分 ) 說明︰1.依提示在「答案卷」上寫一篇英文作文。 2.文長至少120個單詞(words)。 提示:每個人從小到大都有覺得寂寞的時刻,也都各自有排解寂寞的經驗和方法。當你感到寂寞時, 有什麼人、事或物可以陪伴你,為你排遣寂寞呢?請以此為主題,寫一篇英文作文,文長至 少 120 個單詞。文分兩段,第一段說明你會因為什麼原因或在何種情境下感到寂寞,第二段 描述某個人、事或物如何伴你度過寂寞時光。

懸賞詳解

國二歷史下第一次

6.請問1845年到中國經商的英國商人「最不可能」到下列何地從事貿易活動 ?(A)上海(B)漢口(C)廈 門(D)廣州。 ....

50 x

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106 年 - 106年大學入學考試指定考試-英文科#62729-阿摩線上測驗

106 年 - 106年大學入學考試指定考試-英文科#62729