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103 年 - 新北市立高級中等學校 103 學年度教師聯合甄選#16430 

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1.1. The millionaire has a _____ for ancient Chinese water-color paintings and stores a wide collection of them in his mansion.
(A) penchant
(B) harbinger
(C) panacea
(D) magnate
2.2. The inclement weather made the expedition even more _____, but all the crew members agreed to continue their journey instead of taking a rest.
(A) callous
(B) laconic
(C) erratic
(D) treacherous
3.3. It shocked everyone in the company that a clerk had _____ nearly three million dollars and absconded abroad.
(A) embezzled
(B) deluded
(C) litigated
(D) subjugated
4.4. The marketing director _____ from previous experience that this new social network app wouldn’t stand long due to lack of an interactive platform.
(A) enumerated
(B) extrapolated
(C) repudiated
(D) scavenged
5.5. Some developing countries such as Brazil and Venezuela are facing the _____ of struggling between economic development and environmental conservation.
(A) crotchet
(B) rancor
(C) peccadillo
(D) conundrum
6.6. The outbreak of the _____ influenza that has already caused two deaths provoked widespread panic in the town.
(A) staunch
(B) sardonic
(C) virulent
(D) pungent
7.7. The information shared on Facebook is _____ as there are such myriads of news feeds popping up every day that people soon forget what they have read.
(A) recondite
(B) ephemeral
(C) germane
(D) supercilious
8.8. Not having the heart to _____ his parents’ pride of their only son, Kevin gave up his dream of playing tennis as a professional and became a lawyer as expected.
(A) truncate
(B) lacerate
(C) annihilate
(D) obfuscate
9.9. While many of us take potable water for granted, it is notable that some areas do suffer from a _____ of clean water to use or to drink.
(A) paucity
(B) chrysalis
(C) catharsis
(D) torpor 第 2 頁/共 8 頁
10.10. Ellen DeGeneres, always receiving her guests with an affable but not _____ manner, is a casual and humorous host.
(A) vicarious
(B) spurious
(C) incandescent
(D) obsequious
11.11. The blue-and-white porcelain is a genuine antique, so please carry it _____ lest you drop it.
(A) tumultuously
(B) insinuatingly
(C) gingerly
(D) cravenly
12.12. This movie featured nothing but _____ pageants. Although the visual effects were impressive, the jumpy and nonsensical plot development inevitably ruined it.
(A) insipid
(B) mellifluous
(C) specious
(D) sanguine
13.13. The only _____ of the old man’s career as a car racer were the trophies and documentaries on the shelf.
(A) bonanzas
(B) vestiges
(C) ruminations
(D) emoluments
14.14. Kevin felt completely _____ under the scorching heat of the sun, wishing that the routine basketball practice could end as fast as possible.
(A) enervated
(B) infatuated
(C) mortified
(D) excoriated
15.15. Those who practice _____ try to abstain from sex and avoid any physical intimacy with others.
(A) debauchery
(B) hedonism
(C) lassitude
(D) celibacy
16.
(A) IT’S a nearby country where most natives speak English and there are 16 major cultural differences from the United States. 17 the number of Americans choosing to head north to retire in Canada has remained low—reaching a high of 1,675 in 2008 (for immigrants older than 49), then dipping to 1,060 in 2011, and 18 again in 2013 to an estimated 1,565. Recent changes to immigration law have dimmed Canada’s 19 somewhat, certainly to wealthy would-be residents, who were once eligible to immigrate if they had a net worth of $1.6 million and could offer an $800,000 interest-free, five-year loan to the federal government. That program, which attracted some people with money but little commitment to Canadian life, was 20 in February, and 50,000 applications are to be returned. But for some Americans, Canada’s more liberal social and economic policies, including 21 health care from the government, remain deeply appealing. So, too, is the 22 of a country with spectacular landscapes and, in some places, more affordable real estate.

【題組】16.
(A) few
(B) a few
(C) little
(D) a little
17.【題組】17.
(A) So
(B) While
(C) Whereas
(D) Yet
18.【題組】18.
(A) rise
(B) rising
(C) appear
(D) appearing
19.【題組】19.
(A) interest
(B) attract
(C) appeal
(D) outlook 第 3 頁/共 8 頁
20.【題組】20.
(A) deleted
(B) rid
(C) invoked
(D) dropped
21.【題組】21.
(A) cradle-to-doom
(B) cradle-to-dome
(C) cradle-to-grave
(D) cradle-to-cross
22.【題組】22.
(A) draw
(B) drag
(C) signal
(D) hint
23.
(B) Since I started writing about cybersecurity, I’ve developed something of a reputation for paranoia. I set up 23 passwords for every website, 24 two-step authentication whenever I can, 25 for credit monitoring and regularly use secure mobile apps to speak with sensitive sources. I also cover my computer’s web camera with a masking tape, and one night—during some paranoia-fraught weeks reporting on Chinese 26 —I even went so far as to move my television out of my bedroom just in case somebody was lurking in my cable box. In short, I have become completely 27 about protecting my personal data. So imagine my reaction the other week when my own father sent a text message 28 my Social Security number, driver’s license number, birth date, account number, phone number, email address and full name— 29 everything one would need to steal my identity—to people in his address book. Suffice to say, I was not exactly calm, cool and collected. It was an honest mistake, of course, but it was 30 . I’ve taken companies to task for storing personal data and chastised perfect strangers for not 31 password PINs on their phones. But security experts like to say security is only 32 the weakest link. And in this case, the weakest link—I’m sorry to say—was my dad.

【題組】23.
(A) complex
(B) incredible
(C) unimaginable
(D) simplified
24.【題組】24.
(A) permit
(B) open
(C) offer
(D) enable
25.【題組】25.
(A) sign off
(B) sign in
(C) sign up
(D) sign on
26.【題組】26.
(A) hack
(B) hacked
(C) hacking
(D) hacks
27.【題組】27.
(A) paranoia
(B) obsessive
(C) nervous
(D) impulsive
28.28.
(A) containing
(B) contained
(C) claiming
(D) claimed
29.29.
(A) fundamentally
(B) honestly
(C) significantly
(D) essentially
30.
(B) Since I started writing about cybersecurity, I’ve developed something of a reputation for paranoia. I set up 23 passwords for every website, 24 two-step authentication whenever I can, 25 for credit monitoring and regularly use secure mobile apps to speak with sensitive sources. I also cover my computer’s web camera with a masking tape, and one night—during some paranoia-fraught weeks reporting on Chinese 26 —I even went so far as to move my television out of my bedroom just in case somebody was lurking in my cable box. In short, I have become completely 27 about protecting my personal data. So imagine my reaction the other week when my own father sent a text message 28 my Social Security number, driver’s license number, birth date, account number, phone number, email address and full name— 29 everything one would need to steal my identity—to people in his address book. Suffice to say, I was not exactly calm, cool and collected. It was an honest mistake, of course, but it was 30 . I’ve taken companies to task for storing personal data and chastised perfect strangers for not 31 password PINs on their phones. But security experts like to say security is only 32 the weakest link. And in this case, the weakest link—I’m sorry to say—was my dad.

【題組】30.
(A) invincible
(B) unforgiving
(C) infuriating
(D) enticing
31.【題組】31.
(A) setting up
(B) giving
(C) producing
(D) showing
32.【題組】32.
(A) stronger than
(B) as strong as
(C) weaker than
(D) as weak as
33. III. 篇章結構:10%,每題 2 分 During the period from 1648 to 1780, Europe was not well off everywhere. Famine was the occasional collective crisis in the life of the poor. 33 Poverty was the normal condition of at least half the people of Europe. Of this mass the more fortunate did certainly live in a reasonably secure way: they were those who had sufficient land, perhaps 15 acres or more, or a regular living wage. 34 Below those fortunate ones ranged a great many who could slide into the pit of destitution at any time. Because of the lack of realizable assets, debt was a familiar condition everywhere: unlikely to be repaid, usually the start of a progressive 第 4 頁/共 8 頁 decline. 35 It might be illness or injury to a bread winner, the failure of a crop or the death of a cow—any one such event could be fatal. There was a tendency to marry later, while a surprisingly high proportion of western European girls, between 10 to 15 percent, did not marry at all. Among the rest, almost half married after the age of 25. 36 On the other hand, there was generally no understanding of birth control for the poor, though in desperation a couple might practice some voluntary abstinence. 37 The prevalence of infanticide has a grim significance. A drain opened in Rennes in the course of rebuilding in 1721 revealed the skeletons of eighty babies suffocated in the first hours of life.
(A) Anyone who possesses neither goods nor chattels is destined to fall into misery at the least accident.
(B) The poor had no reserves, and the third or fourth child was a disaster for many young families.
(C) Nature has way of restoring the precarious balance between people and resources.
(D) As the price of bread soared beyond the earning capacity of the poor, the church began to take over obligations of relief. (AB) This was the key to the rate of child-bearing—the real contraceptive weapon of classical Europe. (AC) Whatever the variants, the essence of the situation was that enough was earned to provide the daily bread.

【題組】33.
34.【題組】34.
35.【題組】35.
36.【題組】36
37.【題組】37
38. IV. 閱讀測驗:16%,每題 2 分 WHEN Doug Hollan arrived on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi for his anthropology dissertation fieldwork in a rice farming village, his Toraja neighbors wanted to take turns sleeping with him and his wife. The rural Toraja almost never sleep alone. They sleep in wood frame houses with little furniture and flimsy room dividers, and they sleep on the floor together in groups, sharing blankets and huddling close for warmth. And so the Toraja have “punctuated” sleep. They wake often as others turn and get up in the night, or when a child calls out or another adult can’t sleep and starts to chat. Mr. Hollan never heard anyone complain about this. Many years after he returned from Toraja, Mr. Hollan became a psychotherapist and opened a practice in Los Angeles. Most of his clients have voiced discomfort, at some point or another, with their sleep. They do so even though they have what you might imagine would be the perfect conditions to sleep soundly. They have private darkened rooms that they share with at most one person and, often, expensively manufactured beds that minimize disturbance to the other person when one gets up in the night. His clients want to make sure they get seven or eight hours of continuous sleep, and when they try to sleep but they can’t, they get upset. They are not alone. The National Sleep Foundation reports that more than one in five Americans has difficulty falling asleep almost every night, and a 2013 Centers for Disease 第 5 頁/共 8 頁 Control and Prevention study found that about 4 percent of adults in the United States had taken a prescription sleeping pill in the previous month. This obsession with eight hours of continuous sleep is largely a creation of the electrified age. Back when night fell for, on average, half of each 24 hours, people slept in phases. In “At Day’s Close,” a remarkable history of night in the early modern West, Roger Ekirch writes that people fell asleep not long after dark for the “first sleep.” Then they awoke, somnolent but not asleep, often around midnight, when for a few hours they talked, read, prayed, had sex, brewed beer or burgled. Then they went back to sleep for a shorter period. Mr. Ekirch concludes, “There is every reason to believe that segmented sleep, such as many wild animals exhibit, had long been the natural pattern of our slumber before the modern age, with a provenance as old as humankind.” In traditional non-Western societies like the Toraja, what happens at night really matters. People pay close attention to their dreams, and because they are awakened more often, they have more opportunity to remember them. “Thanks to these continuous disruptions,” he writes, “dreams spill into wakefulness and wakefulness into dreams in a way that entangles them both.”
【題組】38. What is the main idea of the article?
(A) Doug Hollan, one of the well-acclaimed psychotherapists in Los Angeles, used to look for insomnia treatment in Indonesia.
(B) Social pressure and fatigue mainly contribute to the seriousness of today’s pandemic insomnia problem.
(C) The concept of eight hours of continuous sleep is not always the golden rule held by everybody.
(D) Patients who suffer from annoying sleeplessness are advised to pay a visit to the island of Sulawesi.
39.【題組】39. In paragraph one, which of the following word can replace “punctuate”?
(A) Continuous.
(B) Gruesome.
(C) Intermittent.
(D) Futile.
40.【題組】40. What can be inferred from the article?
(A) Toraja is a remote area where foreign visitors love to choose as their tourist destination.
(B) Doug Hollan has years of experience in assisting patients to overcome insomnia.
(C) Patients who come to Mr. Hollan are likely to reside in ghettos.
(D) Insomnia often leads to fatigue for modern-day people.
41.【題組】41. Which of the following statement is CORRECT?
(A) Patients at Mr. Hollan’s clinic tend to think 7 to 8 hours of sleep is the norm.
(B) According to the study mentioned in the article, about four percent of Americans had taken a prescription sleeping pill before.
(C) Eight hours of sleep rule has not been widely accepted until the Industrial Revolution.
(D) Mr. Hollan’s clients are often financially-challenged and cannot afford a decent place to sleep. 第 6 頁/共 8 頁
42.【題組】42. Which of the following statement is NOT TRUE?
(A) Mr. Hollan is a paleontologist whose specialty includes anthropology.
(B) The eight hours of sleep daily is an obsession in modern society.
(C) The idea of segment sleep is believed to be wired in humans’ biological pattern.
(D) Not heavily influenced by western culture, Taraja makes a perfect destination for anthropological research.
43.【題組】43. What is not suggested in the article?
(A) Roger Ekirch is the author of a best-seller “At Day’s Close”.
(B) Roger Ekirch is convinced that segment sleep could be one of the sleeping pattern options for humans.
(C) Doug Hollan was married when doing his ground research on the island of Sulawesi.
(D) Doug Hollan was disturbed by the sleeping pattern taken in Toraja.
44.【題組】44. Which of the following statement contradicts the perspective of the article?
(A) Humans differ from wild animals in sleeping patterns.
(B) Doug Hollan’s clients might be believers of continuous sleep.
(C) Toraja is the place that never sleeps.
(D) People who can remember their dreams are more likely to be in segment sleep than continuous sleep.
45.【題組】45. What can be concluded in the article?
(A) Insomnia is a treatable illness that requires joint efforts from doctors and patients.
(B) Eight hours of sleep has been a breakthrough concept in human civilization since the electrified age.
(C) To tackle the problem of insomnia, humans are advised to learn from wild animals that have regular segment sleeping patterns.
(D) The concept of “regular” sleep hours should be revisited and reflected upon. V. 教學法:10%,每題 1 分
46.46. Which of the following is NOT true about the Audiolingual Method?
(A) Grammar is taught more deductively than inductively.
(B) Conditioning and habit-formation are highly emphasized.
(C) Very little use of the mother tongue by teachers is permitted.
(D) Tapes and visuals aids are adopted to assist instruction.
47.47. Which of the following methods puts heavy emphasis on comprehensible input and the communication skills for real-life language situations?
(A) Test-based Language Teaching.
(B) Community Language Learning.
(C) The Silent Way.
(D) The Natural Approach. 第 7 頁/共 8 頁
48.48. Which of the following characteristics conforms to those of Communicative Language Teaching?
(A) Fluency is achieved through mimicry and overlearning.
(B) Students are expected to ultimately use language in unrehearsed context.
(C) The role of a teacher in the classroom is that of director.
(D) Students receive little training in the development of learning strategies.
49.49. Which of the following terms refers to “learners’ ability to take charge of their own learning?”
(A) Automaticity.
(B) Intrinsic motivation.
(C) Autonomy.
(D) Meaningful learning.
50.50. Which of the following order of steps in curriculum design is correct? (1) construct lesson plans (2) analyze situation and needs (3) formulate goals (4) determine course content and design course units
(A) (1) (2) (3) (4)
(B) (3) (2) (4) (1)
(C) (4) (1) (2) (3)
(D) (2) (3) (4) (1)
51.51. Which of the following terms best describes portfolios as an assessment of students’ learning?
(A) Norm-referenced.
(B) Formative.
(C) Product-oriented.
(D) Standardized.
52.52. Which of the following terms refers to “the grammar that second language learners create systematically or quasi-systematically on their way to acquiring the complete grammar of the target language”?
(A) Linguistic competence.
(B) Code-switching.
(C) Interlanguage.
(D) Telegraphic speech. 第 8 頁/共 8 頁
53.53. Which of the following terms refers to “individual characteristics of intellectual and emotional functioning such as cognition and personality?”
(A) Style.
(B) Language ego.
(C) Strategy.
(D) Self-efficacy.
54.54. Which of the following statements is true about deductive and inductive grammar instruction?
(A) In the inductive approach, rules are given to students before examples.
(B) The inductive approach helps build more intrinsic motivation.
(C) The deductive approach is more in keeping with natural language acquisition.
(D) The deductive approach is more appropriate in most contexts because of its focus on accuracy.
55.55. When testing speaking, which of the following descriptions is an interactive task?
(A) Describing a picture.
(B) Retelling a news event.
(C) Having a job interview.
(D) Giving a directed response.